Maybe it’s ten year’s of self-employment that has created a sense of DIY in everything I do and lead me to tackle making a movie practically alone. Or maybe it’s my stubborn pride and ego that imagines I can do most things better than anyone else ┬ácan. (Which is totally not the case. Just ask my parents about my illustrious motocross career.) Either way I set out to make a movie in a year. I could have asked for help, but when you ask for help and can’t pay anyone to help you it puts the timeline ball in their court. Which means I would lose control of the project real quick and a one year project could easily turn into a three year project. So, if I couldn’t get help, I just did it myself. As with all the photography on the bike. If I needed a shot of myself one would think I would get someone to film that for me. But I’m pretty picking on exactly what I wanted. And if you want it done right, just do it yourself. (That way when you screw up you have no one to blame but yourself.) As you can see in the shot below it is exactly what I was going for. Although I am missing one arm. The price you pay for being a one man crew.

DIY Camera Work

DIY Camera Work

Maybe I would have asked for help if I could have afforded to pay someone to work for me. They say you get what you pay for, and when it comes to bike repair that is one thing I just haven’t been able to bring myself to pay for either. Although I should. Because aside from pumping up my tires and oiling my chain a professional mechanic is much better suited for the work than myself. And so in the spirit of most professional messengers the film covers a little DIY bike repair. Both visually and verbally.

DIY-Bike-Repair

DIY Bike Repair

Now what would a documentary be without great interview’s. And no doc is complete without at least one authority on the subject of the film. This is where I found Jeff Kidder to fill that void. If I could have I would have tried doing all the interview’s with disguises as different people. But it was actually easier to get real people to interview. Although that left me with the question on how to capture the interviews in a unique way. I knew I didn’t want your typical documentary interview format. So I thought it was a no brainer to conduct all my interviews about messengers while riding. Of course that meant I had to carry the camera, look at my notes AND ride my bike at the same time. Sure, my arm got real tired, but I pulled it off. And the audio sounds really great too! Here is a still of my first interview for the film. Jeff tells all he learned from studying bike messengers for over 3 years and a little from the book he wrote on the subject.

DIY-Interview

DIY-Interview